Feel better in 3 steps Learn More, Get Help and Take Action

Most People Don't Discuss Their Heavy Drinking With A Care Provider

Only 25% of males and 22% of females reported having talked about alcohol use with a health care provider in the past 2 years1.

Screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT)2 has been shown to be effective in reducing harmful levels of drinking and alcohol-related harm in primary care and emergency care settings.

REFER A PATIENT

The Benefits of Joining ALAVIDA

Patient-centred care

We believe patient-centred care is relevant to all patients. As such, we work collaboratively with patients to set goals: some patients work towards abstinence, while others aim to reduce their consumption and regain control of their drinking.

Success in many forms

While many of our patients achieve abstinence, others reduce the impact of alcohol on their health, relationships, and careers. If harm reduction makes sense for those who struggle with opiate use (and it clearly does!) why not for the substantially larger number of patients who struggle with alcohol?

Compassion and
understanding

We believe that shame and judgment have no place in the treatment for those who struggle with addiction, so we've replaced them with an approach grounded in compassion and understanding.

It's all about the Science

We believe in science. We combine cognitive-behavioural therapy, evidence-based medicine, and technology to support patients in meeting their goals. Think less 12 step, more RCTs. We base our approach on research regarding what works for patients with AUD, and we support our patients with evidence-based medications, such as those recommended in the 2018 American Psychiatric Association guidelines.

Taking down walls

We believe in reducing barriers to care and, as such, see patients by secure video conferencing from their homes or workplaces. We believe that cost shouldn’t be a barrier to care. We do, however, need to keep the lights on. Our two year program isn't free, but it's a fraction of the cost of residential care, with significantly better outcomes. We’re working daily with insurers and employers to help make our program accessible to everyone who needs it.

Transparency

We believe in transparency and openness. We publish our success rate online, and update our statistics regularly. Since starting in North America in 2016, we’ve had an 82% success rate3 in helping patients either regain control of their alcohol use or achieve abstinence.

An Overview of
The Problem, The Program and The Results

The Problem

The Problem

Alcohol was the third leading risk factor for death and disability globally in 20104

  • Heavy drinking is 5+ drinks for men and 4+ drinks for women on 1 occasion at least once a month over a 1-year period — self-reported by 18% of people age 12 and older
  • The economic costs of alcohol-related harm are estimated to have been over $249 Bi (USA, 2010) and $14 Bi(Canada, 2002)
  • In 2015–2016, there were about 77,000 hospitalisations entirely caused by alcohol vs. 75,000 for heart attacks.
See more
The Program

The Program

Science-based, compassionate care, that combines counselling, modern pharmacologic treatment and technology to help patients achieve success

The Alavida program includes:
  • 6 months of multidisciplinary treatment by physicians and therapists, with up to 18 months of follow-up and continuing care
  • Up-to-date counselling methods, and modern pharmacologic treatment to help patients achieve success
  • Easy-to-use online platform to help patients track cravings, triggers, and consumption and share with the care team in real-time.
See more
The Results

The Results

The care team helps patients set and work towards their goals, and in under 6 months, be proud of the results3.

Compared to the weeks prior to treatment with Alavida:
  • 82% achieved goals of reduction or abstinence;
  • 87.2% increased control over their drinking;
  • 91.6% moderately severe to severe cases of depression reduced to Mild or None;
  • 86.6% moderately severe to severe cases of anxiety reduced to mild or none.
See more

The Program

Science Based Treatment

Combined medical and cognitive-behavioural therapy to treat problem drinking with a personal doctor and therapist.

+

Technology

Walk-in-the-park, secure and HIPAA compliant platform to track the individual's progress and share with their care team, for a real-time custom treatment.

=
82.5%

Regain Control of Drinking3

1

Doctor Appointment

A doctor assesses the individual's drinking habits and customizes the ALAVIDA program: physical health is assessed and medication prescription is tailored to their needs, whether the goal is to drink less, or quit drinking.

2

Track Your Habits

The client tracks their drinking, triggers and medication use daily, and monitors their progress right from their pocket.

3

Clinical Guidance

Their personal team of therapist + physician works with them to guide through treatment for 6 months, with in-depth sessions and weekly check-ins to help the reach their goals. The medication helps with the cravings, while therapy helps to replace the pleasure with everyday experiences.

4

Continuing Care

Once the goals are reached, we continue supporting the person up to 18 months with additional tailored program components to keep them on-track and reinforce success.

Join The Team

Physician

Physician

If you're looking to refer a patient, please click here or call 1-888-315-3634. Apply today to join us.

Apply today
Therapist

Therapist

MI and CBT are some tools we use to replace the pleasure from alcohol with daily experiences. Want to join?

Apply today
Researcher

Researcher

At ALAVIDA, we love science. Please reach out if you're a researcher interested in collaborating with us!.

Apply today

Life-changing Stories From Our Clients

Learn about stories from actual clients that have been through the Alavida Program.

I used this program and it changed my life. If you want to be able to drink with your friends and be able to control overdoing it, this program works. It took away my constant urge to drink while still being able to drink socially. Other programs ask you to change your friends, hangouts and abstain.

There was no judgement at all. They were kind. It was said over and over again that this was a medical issue, not a moral issue. I had no idea that the program could be so simple. Even though it wasn’t easy. I’ve got my self-respect back, I didn’t even notice a craving. I took the pill when I first started ...and within six weeks the change has been phenomenal. I don’t have to worry about being hungover and I don’t take the pills all the time anymore.

Thank you Alavida for being an integral part of my reclamation of my life!!! I am truly amazed and dumbfounded by how the science based method has truly helped restore my brain and the thought process.... They say 'once an addict always an addict'..... I don't think I believe that anymore

The Research

Clinical trials and research studies supporting the Alavida Treatment Method.

  • Kranzler, H. R., & Kirk, J. (2001). Efficacy of naltrexone and acamprosate for alcoholism treatment: A meta‐analysis. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 25(9), 1335-1341.

    Abstract
  • Streeton, C., & Whelan, G. (2001). Naltrexone, a relapse prevention maintenance treatment of alcohol dependence: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 36(6), 544-552.

    Abstract
  • Jarosz, J., Miernik, K., Wąchal, M., Walczak, J., & Krumpl, G. (2013). Naltrexone (50 mg) plus psychotherapy in alcohol-dependent patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse, 39(3), 144-160.

    Abstract
  • Donoghue, K., Elzerbi, C., Saunders, R., Whittington, C., Pilling, S., & Drummond, C. (2015). The efficacy of acamprosate and naltrexone in the treatment of alcohol dependence, Europe versus the rest of the world: a meta‐analysis. Addiction, 110(6), 920-930.

    Abstract
  • Srisurapanont, M., & Jarusuraisin, N. (2005). Naltrexone for the treatment of alcoholism: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 8(02), 267-280.

    Abstract
  • Jonas, D. E., Amick, H. R., Feltner, C., Bobashev, G., Thomas, K., Wines, R., ... & Garbutt, J. C. (2014). Pharmacotherapy for adults with alcohol use disorders in outpatient settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis.Jama, 311(18), 1889-1900.

    Abstract
  • Rösner, S., Leucht, S., Lehert, P., & Soyka, M. (2008). Acamprosate supports abstinence, naltrexone prevents excessive drinking: evidence from a meta-analysis with unreported outcomes. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 22(1), 11-23.

    Abstract
  • Carmen, B., Angeles, M., Ana, M., & María, A. J. (2004). Efficacy and safety of naltrexone and acamprosate in the treatment of alcohol dependence: a systematic review. Addiction, 99(7), 811-828.

    Abstract
  • Agosti, V. (1995). “The Efficacy of Treatment in Reducing Alcohol Consumption: A Meta-Analysis.” International Journal of Addictions 30:1067-1077.

    Abstract
  • Altshuler, H.L., Phillips, P.E., & Feinhandler, D.A. (1980). “Alteration of Ethanol Self-Administration by Naltrexone.” Life Sciences 26:679-688.

    Abstract
  • Bohn, M.J., Kranzler, H.R., Beazoglou, D., & Staehler, B.A. (1994). “Naltrexone and Brief Counseling to Reduce Heavy Drinking.” The American Journal on Addictions 3:91-99.

    Abstract
  • Garbutt, J.C., West, S.L., Carey, T.S., Lohr, K.N., & Crews, F.T. (1999). “Pharmacological Treatment of Alcohol Dependence: A Review of the Evidence.” Journal of American Medical Association 281:1318-1325.

    Abstract
  • Heinälä, P., Alho, H., Kiianmaa, K., Lönnqvist, J., Kuoppasalmi, K., Sinclair, J.D., & Kiianmaa, K. (2001). “Targeted Use of Naltrexone Without Prior Detoxification in the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence: A Factorial Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 21(3):287-292.

    Abstract
  • Kranzler, H.R., Tennen, H., Penta, C., & Bohn, M.J. (1997). “Targeted Naltrexone Treatment of Early Problem Drinkers.” Addictive Behaviors 22:431-436.

    Abstract
  • Litten, R.Z., Croop, R.S., Chick, J., McCaul, M.E., Mason, B., & Sass, H.(1996). “International Update: New Findings on Promising Medications.” Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 20:216A-218A.

    Abstract
  • Mason, B.J., Ritvo, E.C., Morgan, R.O., Salvato, F.R., Goldberg, G., Welch, B., & Mantero-Atienza, E. (1994). “A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nalmefene HCL for Alcohol Dependence.” Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 18:1162-1167.

    Abstract
  • Mason, B.J., Salvato, F.R., Williams, L.D., Ritvo, E.C., & Cutler, R.B. (1999). “A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Oral Nalmefene for Alcohol Dependence.” Archives of General Psychiatry 56:719-724.

    Abstract
  • Maxwell, S. & Shinderman, M.S. (2000). “Use of Naltrexone in the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders in Patients with Concomitant Major Mental Illness.” Journal of Addictive Diseases 19(3).

    Abstract
  • O’Malley, S.S., Jaffe, A.J., Chang, G., Schottenfeld, R.S.,Meyer, R.E., & Rounsaville, B. (1992). “Naltrexone and Coping Skills Therapy for Alcohol Dependence.” Archives of General Psychiatry 49:881-887.

    Abstract
  • O’Malley, S.S., Jaffe, A.J., Chang, G., Rode, S., Schottenfeld, R.S., Meyer, R.E., & Rounsaville, B. (1996). “Six-month Follow-up of Naltrexone and Psychotherapy for Alcohol Dependence.” Archives of General Psychiatry 53: 217-224.

    Abstract
  • Renault, P.F. (1980). “Treatment of Heroin-Dependent Persons with Antagonists: Current Status.” In Naltrexone: Research Monograph 28, ed. R.E. Willett & G. Barnett, 11-22. Washington, D.C.: National Institute on Drug Abuse.

    Abstract
  • Sinclair, J.D. (2001). “Evidence about the Use of Naltrexone and for Different Ways of Using It in the Treatment of Alcoholism.” Alcohol & Alcoholism 36: 2-10.

    Abstract
  • Volpicelli, J.R., Alterman, A.I., Hayashida, M.,& O’Brien, C.P. (1992). “Naltrexone in the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence.” Archives of General Psychiatry 49:876-880.

    Abstract
  • Mann K, Bladström A, Torup L, Gual A, Van den Brink E. Extending the Treatment Options in Alcohol Dependence: A Randomized Controlled Study of As-Needed Nalmefene. Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Dec 10. doi:pii: S0006-3223(12)00942-0. 10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.10.020.

    Abstract

View all

References

  1. Alavida client completion data Nov'17 - Apr'18. 82.5% reported feeling more in control of drinking and significantly improved their ability to stop drinking once they started, on average in 6 months.
  2. Sacks, J.J, Gonzales, K.R., Bouchery, E.E., Tomedi, L.E., & Brewer, R.D. (2015). 2010 national and state costs of excessive alcohol consumption. American journal of preventive medicine, 49(5), e73-e79.
  3. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2009). Preventing mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders among young people: Progress and possibilities. Washington, DC: National Academies Press
  4. Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health.